More of How Sweet the Sound: A Novel in pictures

I’m on blogging hiatus for a couple of weeks as I make copyedits to my upcoming second novel, Then Sings My Soul (3/2014). In the meantime, enjoy these collections of photos with quotes from How Sweet the Sound.

Do you have a favorite quote or quotes from this novel? Share it in the comments, below!
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An overview in pictures. How Sweet the Sound: A Novel

Since I’m eyeball deep with an intense round of copy edits (I cannot even tell you how excited I am about this book!!!!!) for my second novel (Then Sings My Soul, 3/2015), I thought I’d share some photo squares and repost some of the things I’ve posted since How Sweet the Sound released. Enjoy!

And if you’ve read How Sweet the Sound, tell us why you’d recommend it to others in the comments!

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What’s a cat food factory got to do with it? On research and novel writing and a sample of How Sweet the Sound

I must’ve switched majors at least twenty times when I was in college.

I wish I was exaggerating for my poor parents’ sake, but I just couldn’t settle on one subject.

I liked them all.

Politics and history, literature and poetry, pre-med and genetics and microbiology and plant biology and even organic chemistry. (Except math. I hated math.)

Eventually, I finished (!) with a bachelors in nursing (which I also love to this day). And while at the time all that major switching felt confusing and uncertain and even dizzying to my roommates and family (for the love, Amy, just PICK something!!!), now that I’m a novelist, I know why I had such a hard time settling in to one subject of study.

For every page of a book of mine you read, you can be sure there are at least ten pages of research behind it.

And I love every second of the research I do for my novels.

In fact, research might be my favorite part of novel writing. Take How Sweet the Sound. It’s set in 1979 and 1980. In one scene, the protagonist, Anni, is at the beauty parlor flipping through a Seventeen magazine. I had to research who was on the cover of Seventeen that month. That led me to eBay and vintage magazine web sites.

Moreover, the entire book is set on a pecan orchard, which I had no clue about except for driving past them on the highway on the way to the Alabama gulf coast. I bought books on pecan cultivation, watched YouTube videos on pecan harvesting, scoured agricultural websites and read tens of copies of newsletters published online by pecan growers all across the South.

I researched cars of that era, top ten song lists, foods, clothing, hair styles, cotillion rules, square dancing, the biology and weather patterns of Mobile Bay, plants of the region, birds, dialect, the history of the Freedom Riders, and so much more.

My second novel, Then Sings My Soul coming March 1, 2015, takes place partially in Ukraine before the Russian Revolution, and partially in 1990’s South Haven, Michigan. I won’t even begin to tell you how much research that one took!

As another example of novel research and a special treat, I thought I’d share the first few paragraphs of How Sweet the Sound with you, and in particular, I want you to notice the mention of the cat food factory. It was a real place, and it really did provide ice to folks back when Hurricane Frederic hit the area. You can click here to read the website from which I gleaned this information: Remembering Hurricane Frederic : The Alabama Weather Blog. (Make sure you read Tom’s comments on that page.)

So see, for those of you who suspected I was a great big nerd, now you know for sure!

*****

How Sweet the Sound

CHAPTER 1

I thought I’d lived through everything by the time I was thirteen. Hurricane Frederic nearly wiped the southern part of Alabama off the map that fall, and half of our family’s pecan orchards along with it. Daddy said we were lucky—that the Miller pecan farm down the road lost everything. The Puss ’n Boots Cat Food factory supplied our whole town of Bay Spring with ice and water for nearly a week until the power and phones came back on along the coast of Mobile Bay. Anyone who could hold a hammer or start up a chain saw spent weeks cutting up all the uprooted trees and azaleas, pounding down new shingles, and cleaning up all that God, in His infinite fury, blew through our land. Like most folks who lived along the coast, we’d find a way to build back up—if we weren’t fooled into thinking the passing calm of the eye meant the storm was over.

If I’d only known this about Hurricane Frederic—that the drudging months leading up to Thanksgiving would be the only peace we’d see for some time. Weren’t no weathermen or prophets with megaphones standing on top of the Piggly Wiggly Saturday mornings to shout warnings of storms and second comings to us.

The only warning was the twitch of my grandmother’s eye…

*****

Want to read more of How Sweet the Sound? Visit your local, independent book seller, or click one of the retailers on the sidebar here to get yourself a copy. I’d be much obliged. And besides that, you never know what else you might learn from all the research embedded in this little tale!

 *****

P.S. Here’s a really old Puss ‘n Boots cat food commercial: